Calculating Evolution

Okay, give me a showing of hands: Who wants to wake up at 12:30 AM and spend a few hours reading an intensely technical article on genetic mutation rates?

I didn’t think so.

Well, I just did. The reason is that, since 1999, I have been working (off and on – mostly off) on the question: Does mathematics support evolution theory, or not? As of the year 2003, when I had to put it to bed due to personal catastrophes, my calculations said, “No.”

Considering that there are 3 billion gene pairs in the human genome, and 4.3 billion years since the surface of the Earth cooled enough to support life as we know it, one might think that’s enough time to propagate all the species about which we know anything. But it isn’t.

After recovering some of the things we had in storage since 2003, I found backups of those files (early versions, in Word and Excel). I was going to finish them up again and post them here, but I decided first, since so much time has elapsed since I laid the subject down, evolution science must have advanced a bit.

To begin, I needed a more accurate mutation rate. I decided to Google the string, “mutation+rate.” That’s where I found this pre-publication article linked: “.” (The published article is only available with payment.)

Even now, my calculations, using the best information that I can gather to date, show that only 1.82% of the human genome can be explained by mutation processes. That leaves 98.18% unexplained by evolution science.

It is still not even a good theory, in my estimation. It is an unfortunate property of the evolution science phenomenon that real solutions to its inherent problems may never be found. This article makes that clear.

In sum, isn’t is easier to simply know that, in the beginning, God created the Heavens and the Earth? Or, do you put your trust in some unknown atheist who can manipulate numbers?

Think about it.

Excel Calculations:

Calculating Evolution

Finding Franchise

In our lives, we may find that, every time we think we have acceptance from someone, that acceptance is really a lure to bring you into an exchange. And if you’re still interested after discovering this, you’ll still weigh the cost against the benefits of that exchange. It is only human to want to be the one with the greatest gain. So if the cost to you is greater than the gain, you may be inclined to part ways.

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